Home > Book Reviews > the girl who kicked the hornet’s nest – stieg larsson

the girl who kicked the hornet’s nest – stieg larsson

The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest

It feels like ages since I finished a book.  I started reading The Famished Road by Ben Okri as part of my Reading Group with the library, but got 40% through (according to my Kindle) and just had to stop, as I simply couldn’t get through it, and having to keep picking it up and persevere was depressing me!

So, I picked up The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest as that had been sitting on my ‘To Read’ pile for quite a while.

Seeing as I enjoyed The Girl Who Played With Fire so much, and the fact that it ends with everything so up in the air, I guess it’s a bit odd that I hadn’t got around to reading it before now as I had it sitting around.  However, the Millennium books are all actually rather big and can be a bit daunting/cumbersome for my relatively short tube journey 😀

I’m glad I finished the trilogy though – it was another fast-paced, action-packed., hugely enjoyable romp.  However, although I was really drawn in with the whole tying the loose ends procedure, there were more things about this book that niggled me.

The first two books had a huge cast of characters, but this one includes all of the previous ones and introduces a whole load of new ones, and I found it rather overwhelming.  There were just so many people that I found it hard to keep up with who was who – and sometimes their first names were used, and sometimes their surnames – and so many names were so similar (as I think is typical in Scandinavia) and I often got lost with who was talking/referring to who!

I also got a bit annoyed with a whole plotline concerning Erika Berger, who was always shown to be this strong, switched-on woman, and yet the whole plot relies on the fact that she’s had the wool pulled over her eyes by a couple of people.  It just doesn’t ring true for this character that has been built up over the previous two books.

However, the small negatives didn’t detract from the fact that it was an intensely enjoyable book, and a fitting end to the trilogy storyline.  I highly recommend!

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  1. September 19, 2010 at 7:12 pm

    Loved the series. Found it hard to keep up with the names in the last but made up for by the way loosd ends wrapped up nicely. Known what you mean about Erika, Ithink!

  2. November 4, 2010 at 8:04 pm

    .. the sadness being the death of Larsson shortly after delivering this third volume in the Millenium series to the publisher. I suspect, that given the intention of there being as many as ten (10) books in this series (not a trilogy), that we would have seen the return of Erika Berger (bigger and better), more development of the characters introduced here, and probably a bundle more to boot. I also had trouble keeping up with all the players (one almost needed a scorecard) and found myself backtracking often. I can hardly wait the remaining couple of weeks before I am able to see how the film-makers have dealt with it all.

    • November 5, 2010 at 9:44 am

      I saw an interview somewhere with the long-term (20+ years) girlfriend of Larsson who had received nothing from the publication of the books as they were never married. I believe she objected to how the books were marketed etc as she had helped him write them, and that she has the 4th on her laptop and has refused to sell it.

      • November 5, 2010 at 6:05 pm

        As I understand it, the copyright laws are very convoluted, and no one can do anything toward further publication as the work was never submitted to a publisher by the author.

  3. teadevotee
    January 26, 2011 at 10:01 am

    YES! I wanted to comment on the names thing too, but I thought perhaps I was just being ignorant (oh, all those foreign names are too hard for my English brain!)

    • January 26, 2011 at 10:20 am

      Perhaps I’m more used to appearing foolish 😉 I think that it’s important to point out that sometimes reading translations comes with its own negatives. Although I didn’t find this issue with 1222, Omon Ra or The Howling Miller (although they had smaller casts).

      I think it was the jumping around using first names or surnames for people – it had the feeling of effectively doubling the already huge list of characters!

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